A successful detox program is different for everyone who experiences it. No two addicts are the same. They battle entirely different demons. They suffer health issues unrelated to the health issues of others. They aren’t in control of their own actions at this point, and detox programs help people change their lives. Whether you are the loved one of an addict or you are the addict, it’s seeking help that begins the detox program. How patients come to realize they need help is personal. Many feel they’ve hit rock bottom at a certain point in their lives, and it’s that feeling of fear and desperation that causes them to seek treatment. Others seek a detox program after their friends and family admit they’re worried and fearful for the addict’s life. How an addict gets to the point of seeking treatment for substance abuse is irrelevant. All that matters is they are here to seek treatment, and knowing what to expect is important.

Comfort

The most important thing an addict needs while going through detox and inpatient treatment is comfort. It’s a terrifying life change to go through detox, and it’s not comfortable itself. That’s why a treatment facility with all the comforts of home is so important. When addicts seek help, they need to feel welcomed, important, and as if their lives matter more than they’ve ever mattered. This feeling of safety and comfort allows addicts to open up, to become more honest about their issues, and to become more accepting of what a treatment facility has to offer.

What is Detox?

Detox is the first process patients go through in a detox program. It’s uncomfortable, and it’s unpleasant. However, it’s imperative. Detox is imperative because it’s dangerous. It’s never recommended a patient attempts to detox on his or her own. It’s too unsafe in terms of their health, and that’s why supervised detox is so important. No one knows how they will experience detox withdrawal symptoms. There’s no solid way to tell how bad the detox process will be for a patient, but there are some telling factors that indicate the potential severity.

  • Age of the addict
  • Type of addiction
  • Length of addiction
  • Family history of addiction
  • Health history

An addict who has been addicted for many years is probably going to experience more difficult withdrawal symptoms during rehab than an addict who has only been abusing his or her substance of choice for a few months. There’s just no telling, and supervised detox is the best way to handle this part of the program. Withdrawal symptoms range from a few hours to a week or more, and they can be relatively mild or medically severe. The most common symptoms of drug and/or alcohol withdrawal include:

  • Fever
  • High blood pressure
  • Shakes
  • Tremors
  • Irritability
  • Mood swings
  • Anger
  • Resentment
  • Fear
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Inability to sleep
  • Lack of ability to eat
  • Seizures

Some withdrawal symptoms are so dangerous they require patients to seek medical help. When a patient enters a detox facility, supervision is always present. The appropriate medication is issued to anyone who experiences the most severe symptoms. This is used to stop addicts from becoming even sicker or suffering more serious health complications.

Therapies

Following detox, addicts are required to stay in the facility for a certain amount of time. The length of time any client spends here depends heavily on their condition when they enter the facility, their experience in detox, and their addiction history. While in the program, all patients are family and friends. They get to spend time alone, time with people going through the same thing, and time with therapists. Therapy sessions are offered to all patients for a very important reason.

They need to know what causes their addiction. Talking to them allows therapists to see what triggers them, what might cause them to turn to substance abuse, and what they need from treatment. While in the facility, they’re taught to recognize these triggers, how to change their life to avoid those, and how to seek help when it all feels overwhelming. Group therapy is helpful, too. This allows clients to hear from others in the same situation. It allows them to foster friendships with people in the same boat, and it allows patients to open up. Hearing the honesty and candid tales from others with the same issue allows clients to seek the help they need by inspiring them to open up.

No two detox experiences are the same. Treatment for addiction is very personal, and it’s always individually catered to each addict. What one person needs is not what another needs. That’s why choosing the right facility is imperative. You or your loved one needs the best possible care.

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